By Kyandra Simmons, News Writer

Truancy is an action of a student who chooses to stay away from school without good reason, absenteeism.

“It is important that a student attend school regularly because they are more likely to succeed in academics when they attend school consistently,” Mrs. Ramona Suber, attendance secretary, said.

It’s difficult for the teacher and the class to build skills and progress if a large number of students are frequently absent. If students do not attend school frequently, their parents could be charged and would have to pay up to $10 for each absent.

Arriving to school late is counted as a tardy. If there are seven tardies, students are required to spend their Saturday in detention.

“Students that arrive to school after 8:30 have to report to ISS for the remainder of that block until further notice,” Mrs. Betty Gortman, ISS supervisor, said.

Students don’t realize how serious arriving to school on time every day is until they get a call from the school or a letter in the mail stating that they have been truant and have a court date they have to attend.

Some things may legitimately cause students to arrive late to school, like their parents not being able to get home in enough time from work to have them to school on time, or the distance they live from the school, maybe even no transportation at all.

“I wake up late and I don’t just want to come to school looking any kind of way,” Senior Karina Rickard said. “Yes, I understand the consequences. I have an excuse for every missed school day and tardy.”

Some students get to school on time each day due to the bus, and they don’t have to worry about being late or tardy.

“I don’t have a choice to either come to school late or not at all; my mom does not play!” Sophomore Dayvon Goodwin said.

At the age of seventeen students are not required to come to school, which means they can dropout, although the law encourages students to be on time and in school every day.

For more information on attendance and truancy contact Suber at ramona.suber@richlandone.org.

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